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Posts Tagged ‘An Impossible Cast’

Since I’ve lived here in Lead Hill, I’ve witnessed this itinerary of events Dad has so precariously subjected his body to:

– Rammed a large fish hook in his thumb all the way to the curve. Yanked it out himself with needle -nosed pliers. He screamed; I puked.

– Lodged a jerk bait with three treble hooks through his hat into his head while casting. That was some interesting field surgery with a rusty pocket knife and no antiseptic.

– Watched him drive a riding lawn mower after it fell from a ramp… perpendicularly.

– Assisted in breaking his foot by using an unsecured log splitter. He said, “it’ll be fine.”

– Watched Mom pull a one-inch log out of his eye with a pair of needle-nosed pliers after I had just told him to use eye protection while using the table saw. He screamed. I passed out.

And now he has 10 staples in the crown of his head because he can’t hear anyone say, “Timber!”

Just when I thought Mom would be his demise, the plot’s thickened…

Check out more of his shenanigans on Youtube:

And stay tuned for future book signings.

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Tournament on Bull Shoals Lake, Glen’s old and current haunt, this weekend. The winner, who camped in the back of his truck every night, caught his fish just down the lake from Glen’s and Shane’s houses.

Check out photos of Glen with Kevin VanDam on the Bassmaster website: http://www.bassmaster.com/slideshow/behind-scenes-day-three-3

And more photos featuring Glen, Rick Clunn, and Kevin VanDam:

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Last year, seems like it was late summer, I dropped by the Branson Tourist Center complex in Branson, MO, just off Highway 65 to take a quick restroom break. Being unfamiliar with the place, I was unsure the direction to steer myself when I noticed what looked like an opening behind the clerk’s counter area that could be what I needed (emphasis on the word “needed”). I proceeded around the counter and found myself standing in what looked more like a lobby than a restroom foyer. I began staring austerely around at the many magazine covers on the walls with headlines and pictures of fisherman touting big bass.

There was a quaint and smiling gentleman sitting at a coffee table strewn with cups and papers. Observing my confusion, he politely asked me how I was doing and if he could of help.

I asked, “What is this place?” just before I saw the banner on the wall that read “Central Pro-Am Tournaments.” After he recited the name for me, I asked who was in charge, and he replied, “Jim Thompson,” and pointed to an open door on his left. A friendly voice came from the doorway that proclaimed, “Come on in!” just like he was expecting me.

I slowly strolled through the door and into a small office to find a smiling, tanned and slim gentleman, just slightly older than myself coming out of his chair to shake my hand.

“Jim Thompson, how ya doin’?”

“Fine, thanks. Shane Andrews. What, again, exactly is this place?”

“We’re the headquarters for Central Pro-Am Bass Tournaments and I’m the president.”

To which I replied, “Reeeaaaally.”

(Enter Soapbox Shane)

Having put bodily functions on hold, I began my spiel.

Jim listened intently for at least twenty minutes, and was fascinated how he had never heard of my dad, the first two-time world champ basser. He was uncertain of my story, as anyone should be, since the book hadn’t been published yet. He politely asked if I would be interested in doing some different types of promoting together and of course I was interested.

Time passed. After we got published, I sent Jim a book, and he loved it. We stayed in touch, and he asked me if I would bring dad to one of his tournaments to meet him and maybe speak. We came to the weigh-in at a tournament on Table Rock Lake in Kimberling City out back of Ahoy’s Restaurant where we spoke to a small crowd on August 22nd, 2010, and sold a few books. We had a really good time and met some really nice anglers and others within Jim’s fine organization.

Jim later asked if we would be interested in speaking at the Midwest Outdoors Expo at the Hilton Convention Center in Branson. What a vote of confidence he had for us. We were honored.

We did go to the event on October 9th and had a great time. More importantly, Jim introduced me to a couple of VIP’s he had as guest speakers and visitors to the Expo.

One was Jerry Martin of Bass Pro Shop’s Redhead Pro Hunting Team. He is famous as an outdoor hunting guru and is Co-host of Bass Pro Shop’s 100% Real Hunting show on the Versus Network and Co-host of Bass Pro Shop’s King of Bucks on the Outdoor Channel. He is also an Outdoor Hall of Fame Inductee like dad.

He gave us a good chunk of his time and, like Jim, couldn’t believe he had never heard of dad. I believe he was very impressed with our work, and he bought a book. He told me that he and Johnny Morris, owner of Bass Pro Shops, were quite tight and offered to give Johnny a copy of AIC.

Now that’s a big deal…

We also met and charmed John Neporadny, a senior writer for Bassmaster and Bass Times Magazines. He took a book home with him citing he would put the one down he’d been working on and read ours. We hope to have an article about us in one of those two periodicals. Let’s keep praying that “Everything Happens for a Reason” (reference December 3rd, 2009 blog entry).

Dad and I want to thank Jim, Mike West, Kris and Ryan for a great time and opportunity on Saturday at the Expo. We were moved at their helpfulness and courtesy.

Oh, and by the way, Jim, where the heck is that restroom anyway!

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As spring has finally chased off winter, the lake water is finally heating up in the fishing world and the publishing world as well.  After a winter of great publicity through ESPN (twice–see Glen’s Bassography and Jerry McKinnis’s article), Tulsa World, BassFan.com, NPR, and the Shiloh Museum we’re looking to make the rounds in the Ozarks for book signings.  Shane and Glen love entertaining, so it sure to be an enjoyable time for young and old.  We’ve also uploaded some new videos featuring Glen’s storytelling to our Facebook page that were previously only available on YouTube, so check them out too.  In order to bring in the new season, we’ve pulled a new story and a few pictures out of the archives that should put you all right in the boat with Glen to experience the World Champion for yourselves.  Of course you can find many more stories in the book– An Impossible Cast–which you can buy at the Whitefish Press.  We hope you all enjoy!

Some time ago, Glen, Shane, and I put the boat in down at Tucker Hollow on Bull Shoals.  Around 7:30 that morning, Glen came knocking with coffee, chattering excitedly about the day.  Rain had bloated the lake and muddied the water—good conditions for catching bass he said.  Our destination was Bear Creek near Glen’s parents’ old farm.  He’d fished it constantly growing up before it was inundated, but he hadn’t returned in years.  His only concern was the forecasted 5 to 17 mile-per-hour north wind, which he was certain would kill our chances because he’d rarely caught bass with a north wind.

That morning’s trip was sparked by one week earlier when Wayne, an old friend from Rogers, Arkansas, drove across the state with a nice boat and bassin’ fever.  The day he arrived Glen and Shane took him out on the lake.  Shane caught his largest bass ever, a 5.5 pound Largemouth, and Glen wasn’t too embarrassed with a 4 pounder.  They were both embarrassed though that Wayne got skunked.  The next day, Wayne joined the fun as they found a hungry school of Kentuckies near the West Sugarloaf Creek Bridge.  When they called me to come down, Glen had promised that the Kentuckies would still be schoolin’.  His mission was to put me into a mess of them and watch them tear my snuff-box reel to shreds.

Once on the lake, Glen thought we could find lunkers bunched up around the old, submerged Lowry Bridge.  He was confident he could locate the bridge despite our lack of electronics because as a child he’d spent summer Sundays just up the creek near the Lowry grist mill and mill pond.  After church, families would walk down the hill and picnic at the pond.  Children pruned their skin soaking in the water and diving from boulders.  Glen’s memory was accurate.  We found the bridge and Shane caught a 3 pound Largemouth on a crank bait.  Apparently, though, that fish was a loner because we spent most of our time clearing lake trash from the bottom with our spoons.

We weren’t in a hurry though, so the boat drifted with the north wind along a wooded bluff that extended 50 feet into the water from the shore.  Glen decided that he would try for some white bass using one of his homemade spinner baits, which he put on his spinning reel with 6 pound test line.  After fumbling with them for five minutes, he threw them to the bottom of the boat in disgust.  The wind was making his eyes water so that he couldn’t see the line.  Shane put on his glasses and eventually tied the lure on.

“Alright, Jeremy.  You ready to see a big bass.  My squirrel-hair spinner’s gonna tear ‘em up!  Bass love squirrel!”  Glen started to cast and retrieve the homemade lure modeled after Dave Hawk’s Gold Bug.  “Hey Jeremy, did I ever tell you about that time Glen Cossey and I were fishin’ on Greers Ferry Lake back when it was almost new?  Well, we were fishin’ near the bank when we saw a squirrel goin’ after a walnut in a crook on a low hanging branch.  Just as the squirrel reached the walnut, a giant black bass shot out of the water and swallowed that squirrel.  While we were still settin’ there with our jaws between our legs lookin’ at each other, we turned back to the branch, and you know what we saw?  We saw that black bass put the walnut back up in the crook of that branch!”

Throughout Glen’s story, his lure was proving him a liar until the north wind pushed us to the mouth of a creek clogged with washed out branches and trees.  “Uh, oh!” Glen warned.  “I got one.  Aww, but he’s just small one.  Ohhh . . . wait a minute!  Wait a minute, he’s growing!  He’s grown up!  Oh my gosh, it’s big ‘un!  Boy he’s really fightin’ now.  How am I gonna get him in the boat with this little 6 pound line?”  Glen guided the Largemouth to the front of the boat.  He reached down trying to manage both the rod and the bass, “Oh my gosh, I’ve got him!  He’s nearly 5 pounds!”  He threw the monster in bottom of the boat.  “Ha!  My squirrel-hair worked!”  He looked at his contraption proudly.  But that would be the last of the squirrel hair.  As we headed back down the creek, he’d caught some trash on his spinner bait, jerked the rod to remove the trash, and watched as the squirrel-hair arm of the lure broke off and disappeared into the murky water!  Glen blamed the north wind.

Glen's Goldbug sans squirrel hair

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Check it out at:

http://sports.espn.go.com/outdoors/bassmaster/news/story?page=bassography_Andrews

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Just out today!  An incredible review on ESPN outdoors!

http://sports.espn.go.com/outdoors/fishing/columns/story?columnist=mckinnis_jerry&id=4897292

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Sunday, February 7, our book received a fantastic review in the Tulsa World. Check it out below!

Tulsa World Review

Also this month, this article (below) appeared in Midwest Outdoors, written by our good friend and famous lure collector, Dan Basore.

FISHING HISTORY

By Dan Basore

THE BEST BASS FISHERMAN

Do you want to start a debate? Just ask any group of bass chasers, Whose the best? And fur will fly. But some of the greatest names in bassin’ have no doubt it’s Glen Andrews.

Before there was BASS and Bassmaster tournaments the “World Series of Sport Fishing”  tournaments were conducted for ten years. It’s champions include well known fishermen who hosted television shows including Harold Ensley “The Sportsman’s Friend” that ran for 48 years, Virgil Ward of “Championship Fishing”, Joe Krieger, “The Joe Krieger Sportsman Show” and Jimmy Houston host of ESPN’s “Jimmy Houston Outdoors”.

But only one man won the title of “World Champion” more than once, Glen Andrews, and he did it for two years in a row. For the early years as I fished national bass tournaments, and made friends with the nations top bass fishermen, the name Glen Andrews was mentioned by so many as I asked, “Who was the best bass fisherman you ever knew?”

Bill Dance, (23 National wins, three time BASS Angler of the Year), couldn’t say enough about how Glen had taught him so much. In a letter to Shane Andrews, Glen’s son, Dance wrote, “It’s amazing to me how you can meet someone and it can change your whole direction in life. There can be absolutely no doubt that I wouldn’t be doing what I am today had our lines not crossed back then”.

First and a two time winner of the Bassmaster Classic and student of Glen, Bobby Murray wrote, “Glen is probably the greatest angler that no one has ever heard of. However his influence on modern bass fishing is unparalleled by any other angler”.

As we filmed a segment of the long running ESPN “The Fishin’ Hole”, Jerry McKinnis not only extolled the expertise of Glen but even pulled out one of his Twin Spin Lures to save the day with some of our best bass of the show while most other fishermen were skunked that day.

Jerry then introduced me to a friend of his that was moving to my area and Gary Clark became like a brother to me. As we fished locally and in exotic locals in other countries we often talked about Glen Andrews wondering what he was doing and even if he was still alive.

McKinnis wrote recently, “In my business you can imagine how many times someone asks, ‘Who was the best bass fisherman you ever knew?’ Your probably not going to know this man, but Glen Andrews is my reply. I had a wonderful career and I owe a lot of it to Glen”.

Ray Scott, the founder of BASS disclosed, “Glen Andrews probably is the best natural-born bass angler that I have ever met. When you’ve got it you’ve got it, and Glen Andrews has got it!”

Glen wrote the book, “Techniques of Bass Fishing” in 1974 and authored the syndicated “Angler’s World” newspaper column. He also held bass fishing classes.

Of interest to fishers, collectors and fishing historians, Glen was the founder of Andrews Lure Company. His friend Dave Hawk is credited with inventing the plastic worm, “Texas Rig”, but the Andrews Bait Company in Rogers, Arkansas, was the first to package, plastic worms, hooks and slip sinkers along with instructions on how to fish them. They also produced several other productive lures.

Some of the ways he worked lures were revolutionary and now mostly forgotten. For example during cold water periods he taught, “Cast my Twin Spin lure to a steep bank or bluff. Let it fall straight down to the bottom about 12 to 18 feet deep. Pull it gently away and allow it to fall on down the bluff continuing till it’s about 25 feet deep. Now pick it up and hold it-don’t crank it-don’t jig it-just hold it and let it swing all the way under your boat.. Most strikes will come about 10 to 15 feet from the bluff, but I have caught lot’s of bass after the Twin Spin stopped swinging and was just hanging. So always leave it there for a few seconds.”

Glen was a very successful guide for twenty years. The pressure to produce multiple limits for two anglers in the morning and many times two more in the afternoon was much more than catching a big limit himself in a tournament. Glen told me that, “Fishing a tournament was like having a day off.”

When it was time to choose between family life and tournament fishing, Andrews decided on his family. We can only guess what he could have achieved fishing bass tournaments.

There’s so much more to tell. This article can only introduce you to a small glimpse of Glen’s history and his perspective on the history of professional bass fishing that are captured in a new book written by his son D. Shane Andrews and Jeremy Miller and published by Dr. Todd Larson’s Whitefish Press. You can order it at http://www.whitefishpress.com.

If you can help with our search for more old lures or other fishing history, pre-level wind reels, casting tournament items, manufacturers catalogs, bamboo and wood rods etc., please write Dan Basore, Historical Fishing Display, 3 S 375 Herrick Rd., Warrenville, IL 60555, or call 630-393-FISH, that’s 630-393-3474 or toll free 1-800-FISH-LAKe, that’s 1-800-347-4525.. You can also e-mail descriptions and jpg pictures to OLLURES@AOL.COM. Thanks for your help and support.

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